A repost: what your hair really looks like when it is damaged

Ok, I know I’ve written a blog about reconstruction before, but I cannot stress it enough.

In the salon, I hear a lot of excuses. Sure, its an extra $20 added onto your service,and it is an extra 15 minutes of your day. I know that in a busy world with a bad economy, it is hard to cough that up.

But honestly, if you are going to cough up money to color your hair, then you need to do the same to reconstruct your hair… because again you cannot have pretty hair, a nice haircolor, or even a nice haircut without restoring the protein that your hair was made of.

A reconstructor in the salon is not a take home treatment, but many salons and product lines do offer take home versions, to do yourself inbetween salon visits.

I like to suggest the Redken Extreme Repair line of products to all of my blonde clients that get highlights. Especially the CAT Treatment. I cannot live without it, and cannot make bleached hair look beautiful without it!!

Here are your hair shafts…
WHICH ONE ARE YOU?

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Healthy hair.

The cuticle is the outer layer of the shaft and is the first layer to show any type of damage.

You can see that the cutilce is closed, the hair would feel smooth and because of this would reflect light easily causing shiny healthy looking hair.

The cuticle closes after you condition your hair.

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A raised cuticle

This hair would feel rougher to the touch and be less inclined to reflect light. Hair would appear dull and not shiny.

Hair can look like this when it is shampooed and NOT conditioned, Or if it is towel dried or poorly blown out.

The cuticle layers are always facing downward, so when you blow dry your hair, aim the blow drier the same way as the cuticles are facing, and the cuticle will be less raised.

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Overprocessed Hair

The cuticle on this hair is raised extremely.

This hair is typical of damage caused by the hair being over processed when perming or bleaching. Hair would reflect little light causing it to look limp and lifeless.

This is one of the examples of how hair looks before a Chemistry System. You can fix it by reconstructing your hair everytime you get your hair colored, at a minimum. I do a chemistry system every 1- 1/2 weeks (because I color my hair every 3 weeks).

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This hair’s cuticle was stripped, revealing the layer underneath

This is the last picture x2 and beyond. This is what happens when you shrug off the reconstructor and continue to perm or bleach or highlight without taking care of your hair.

We’ve all seen this in person. Bad hair. Big, frizzy, overprocessed hair. Hair that a stylist refuses to color because they are afraid it will break off.

Please please please reconstruct, or use the Redken Extreme Repair line of products.

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A broken strand

…and this is the hair when it does eventually break. Also known as the “chemical haircut”.

This is when we get in trouble because we should have not touched your hair and we did anyway.

This is when you have no other choice but to reconstruct if you want your hair back.

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Damaged hair shaft

This happens when damged hair is stretched and snaps off. Again, from coloring without reconstructing, or even using the wrong shampoo and conditioner.

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Split Ends

…And everyone’s favorite: Split ends.

The only way to cure them? CUT THEM OFF.

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